Wednesday, July 25, 2007

Our Testing Our Suffering

<< 1 Peter 4 >>
12 Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial among you, which cometh upon you to prove you, as though a strange thing happened unto you:
13 but insomuch as ye are partakers of Christ's sufferings, rejoice; that at the revelation of his glory also ye may rejoice with exceeding joy.

Our war against ourselves is perhaps some of our greatest suffering. Each time we say no to the flesh and yes to the spirit, the spirit becomes a little stronger and the flesh exerts a little less influence. This is our war, this is our spiritual worship, this is our strength. Dying to ourselves everyday and living to Christ is our daily task and cross. It will all be so very worth it in the end.
<< 1 Peter 4 >>
19 Wherefore let them also that suffer according to the will of God commit their souls in well-doing unto a faithful Creator.

How We Should Speak and Act as Ambassadors

<< 1 Peter 4 >>
11 if any man speaketh,'speaking as it were oracles of God; is any man ministereth, ministering as of the strength which God supplieth: that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ, whose is the glory and the dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

Our Worship Versus the World's Worship

<< 1 Peter 2 >>
5 ye also, as living stones, are built up a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God through Jesus Christ.

Therefore I urge you, offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God for this is your spiritual act of worship." (Romans 12:1-2)

11 Beloved, I beseech you as sojourners and pilgrims, to abstain from fleshly lust, which war against the soul;

<< 1 Peter 4 >>
1 Forasmuch then as Christ suffered in the flesh, arm ye yourselves also with the same mind; for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;

Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Apostate Christianity and it's Love for War.

I have debated the wolves of today's babylonian christianity about their love for war and how foreign they are to the scripture listed below.
"Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called sons of God" (Matthew 5:9).

I will let another man make the case against today's apostate, babylonian whore masquerading brand of christianity and its adherents.

Spurgeon on Christianity and War

If there is anyone who should be opposed to strife and bloodshed it is the man that names the name of Christ. Spurgeon considered the spirit of war to be absolutely foreign to the spirit of Christianity:
The Church of Christ is continually represented under the figure of an army; yet its Captain is the Prince of Peace; its object is the establishment of peace, and its soldiers are men of a peaceful disposition. The spirit of war is at the extremely opposite point to the spirit of the gospel ("The Vanguard and Rereward of the Church," December 26, 1858, Music Hall, Royal Surrey Gardens).

Far be it from us to lay the blood of men at God’s door. Let us not for one moment be guilty of any thought that the sin and the iniquity which have brought war into the world is of God ("The Desolations of the Lord, the Consolation of His Saints," April 28, 1858, Music Hall, Royal Surrey Gardens, on behalf of the Baptist Missionary Society).

What saves us from war at this moment? What influence is it that is always contrary to war, and always cries for peace? Why, it is the Christian element among us which counts anything better than bloodshed! ("Jesus – ‘All Blessing and All Blest’," February 1, 1891, Metropolitan Tabernacle).

The Lord’s battles, what are they? Not the garment rolled in blood, not the noise, and smoke, and din of human slaughter. These may be the devil’s battles, if you please, but not the Lord’s. They may be days of God’s vengeance but in their strife the servant of Jesus may not mingle. We stand aloof. Our kingdom is not of this world; else would God’s servants fight with sword and spear. Ours is a spiritual kingdom, and the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but spiritual, and mighty through God, to the pulling down of strongholds ("War! War! War!" May 1, 1859, Music Hall, Royal Surrey Gardens).

War is to our minds the most difficult thing to sanctify to God. The genius of the Christian religion is altogether contrary to everything like strife of any kind, much more to the deadly clash of arms. . . . Now I say again, I am no apologist for war, from my soul I loathe it, and I do not understand the position of a Christian man as a warrior, but still I greatly rejoice that there are to be found at this present day in the ranks many of those who fear God and adorn the doctrine of God their Saviour ("A Peal of Bells," July 7, 1861, Metropolitan Tabernacle).

If men receive Christ, there will be no more oppression: the true Christian does to others as he would that they should do to him, and there is no more contention of classes, nor grinding of the faces of the poor. Slavery must go down where Christianity rules, and mark you, if Romanism be once destroyed, and pure Christianity shall govern all nations, war itself must come to an end; for if there be anything which this book denounces and counts the hugest of all crimes, it is the crime of war. Put up thy sword into thy sheath, for hath not he said, "Thou shalt not kill," and he meant not that it was a sin to kill one but a glory to kill a million, but he meant that bloodshed on the smallest or largest scale was sinful. Let Christ govern, and men shall break the bow and cut the spear in sunder, and burn the chariot in the fire. It is joy to all nations that Christ is born, the Prince of Peace, the King who rules in righteousness. ("Joy Born at Bethlehem," December 24, 1871, Metropolitan Tabernacle).